thereligionofpeace:

16-year-old Egyptian Muslim discovers catalyst to turn Egypt’s plastic waste into biofuel 
Azza Abdel Hamid Faiad is not your average 16-year-old. While most teens were delivering pizza or working on their tans this summer, Faiad was discovering a way to turn Egypt’s plastic waste into roughly $78 million worth of biofuels each year.
The idea to use plastic as biofuels is not new, but Faiad, a student at the Zahran Language School in Alexandria, Egypt, has found an inexpensive catalyst that could make the process not only economically feasible, but economically profitable for her country. Egypt’s plastic consumption is estimated to total 1 million tons per year, so Faiad’s proposal could completely transform the country’s economy, while also handling their plastic waste issues.
Faiad says that her catalyst, called aluminosilicate, could inexpensively break down plastic waste while producing gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol. She calculates that her discovery could inexpensively generate about 40,000 tons of cracked naphtha and 138,000 tons of hydrocarbon gases per year — equivalent to $78 million.
The green teen has already won an award for her findings at the 23rd European Union Contest for Young Scientists, and she is currently looking into patenting her idea through the Egyptian Patent Office.
Source: The Green Prophet
[mothernaturenetwork]

thereligionofpeace:

16-year-old Egyptian Muslim discovers catalyst to turn Egypt’s plastic waste into biofuel 

Azza Abdel Hamid Faiad is not your average 16-year-old. While most teens were delivering pizza or working on their tans this summer, Faiad was discovering a way to turn Egypt’s plastic waste into roughly $78 million worth of biofuels each year.

The idea to use plastic as biofuels is not new, but Faiad, a student at the Zahran Language School in Alexandria, Egypt, has found an inexpensive catalyst that could make the process not only economically feasible, but economically profitable for her country. Egypt’s plastic consumption is estimated to total 1 million tons per year, so Faiad’s proposal could completely transform the country’s economy, while also handling their plastic waste issues.

Faiad says that her catalyst, called aluminosilicate, could inexpensively break down plastic waste while producing gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol. She calculates that her discovery could inexpensively generate about 40,000 tons of cracked naphtha and 138,000 tons of hydrocarbon gases per year — equivalent to $78 million.

The green teen has already won an award for her findings at the 23rd European Union Contest for Young Scientists, and she is currently looking into patenting her idea through the Egyptian Patent Office.

Source: The Green Prophet

[mothernaturenetwork]

(via moniquill)


“Morphologically, we’ve built a jellyfish. Functionally, we’ve built a jellyfish. Genetically, this thing is a rat,” says Kit Parker, a biophysicist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who led the work.

Artificial jellyfish built from rat cells

It’s official, we are living in the future. 

(via flavorpill)

dykesanddykery:

Tam O’Shaughnessy: About Sally Ride’s Partner Of 27 Years

Tam O’Shaughnessy was Sally Ride’s partner for 27 years, but their partnership was cut short Monday when Ride — the first American woman in space — died of pancreatic cancer at just 61 years old.
Sally Ride was an American heroine, looked up to by a generation of science lovers ever since she made history by blasting into space on NASA’s shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. On that day she became the first American woman in space.
But her longtime partner, Dr. Tam E. O’Shaughnessy, is a very accomplished woman in her own right.
O’Shaughnessy was by Sally Ride’s side throughout the astronaut’s 17-month battle against cancer, and before Ride became ill they co-authored four books, including “Mission: Planet Earth: Our World and Its Climate — and How Humans Are Changing Them” and “Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System.”
O’Shaughnessy, a professor emerita of school psychology at San Diego State University, is also chief operating officer and executive vice president of Sally Ride’s foundation, named Sally Ride Science, where the duo and their staff nurtured young students and worked to encourage them to pursue their passions in science, tech, engineering and math.

Dr. O’Shaughnessy will not receive the benefits due to the spouses of deceased astronauts, because the United States federal government does not recognize same-sex marriage. Nor has she received much mention or recognition for the active role she took in Dr. Ride’s work as the nation mourns.
As we remember Dr. Ride, we also extend our love and sympathy to her loving partner, Tam O’Shaughnessy. Thank you both for all you’ve done.

dykesanddykery:

Tam O’Shaughnessy: About Sally Ride’s Partner Of 27 Years

Tam O’Shaughnessy was Sally Ride’s partner for 27 years, but their partnership was cut short Monday when Ride — the first American woman in space — died of pancreatic cancer at just 61 years old.

Sally Ride was an American heroine, looked up to by a generation of science lovers ever since she made history by blasting into space on NASA’s shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. On that day she became the first American woman in space.

But her longtime partner, Dr. Tam E. O’Shaughnessy, is a very accomplished woman in her own right.

O’Shaughnessy was by Sally Ride’s side throughout the astronaut’s 17-month battle against cancer, and before Ride became ill they co-authored four books, including “Mission: Planet Earth: Our World and Its Climate — and How Humans Are Changing Them” and “Voyager: An Adventure to the Edge of the Solar System.”

O’Shaughnessy, a professor emerita of school psychology at San Diego State University, is also chief operating officer and executive vice president of Sally Ride’s foundation, named Sally Ride Science, where the duo and their staff nurtured young students and worked to encourage them to pursue their passions in science, tech, engineering and math.

Dr. O’Shaughnessy will not receive the benefits due to the spouses of deceased astronauts, because the United States federal government does not recognize same-sex marriage. Nor has she received much mention or recognition for the active role she took in Dr. Ride’s work as the nation mourns.

As we remember Dr. Ride, we also extend our love and sympathy to her loving partner, Tam O’Shaughnessy. Thank you both for all you’ve done.

(via elfyourmother)


obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Astronaut Sally Ride
Sally Ride, who became the first American woman in space in 1983*, has died of cancer at the age of 61 years old. She decided to join the space program, in 1978, after answering an ad in the newspaper.
Dr. Ride had spent over 340 hours in space on two separate missions, both on the Challenger in 1983 and 1984. When the Challenger exploded in January 1986 she was training for her third mission, instead she found herself on the panel investigating the disaster. Prior to the tragedy she was one of the only individuals to support Roger Boisjoly’s warnings of an imminent disaster. (Boisjoly died in February 2012.)
Sally Ride left the space program in 1987 and worked at her alma mater, Stanford University as well as UC-San Diego. In 2003, following the destruction of the shuttle Columbia, she was invited, once again, to help investigate the accident. (She was the only person to serve on both investigative panels.)
Dr. Ride was inducted into both the Women’s Hall of Fame as well as the Astronaut Hall of Fame. And she was an English major.
Sources: npr.org, wikipedia.org, and biography.com
(Image of Dr. Ride while aboard the Challenger is courtesy of wired.com)
* Prior to Dr. Ride’s launch in June 1983, the Soviets had sent up cosmonauts Valentina Tereshkova (1963) and Svetlana Savitskaya (1983).

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Astronaut Sally Ride

Sally Ride, who became the first American woman in space in 1983*, has died of cancer at the age of 61 years old. She decided to join the space program, in 1978, after answering an ad in the newspaper.

Dr. Ride had spent over 340 hours in space on two separate missions, both on the Challenger in 1983 and 1984. When the Challenger exploded in January 1986 she was training for her third mission, instead she found herself on the panel investigating the disaster. Prior to the tragedy she was one of the only individuals to support Roger Boisjoly’s warnings of an imminent disaster. (Boisjoly died in February 2012.)

Sally Ride left the space program in 1987 and worked at her alma mater, Stanford University as well as UC-San Diego. In 2003, following the destruction of the shuttle Columbia, she was invited, once again, to help investigate the accident. (She was the only person to serve on both investigative panels.)

Dr. Ride was inducted into both the Women’s Hall of Fame as well as the Astronaut Hall of Fame. And she was an English major.

Sources: npr.org, wikipedia.org, and biography.com

(Image of Dr. Ride while aboard the Challenger is courtesy of wired.com)

* Prior to Dr. Ride’s launch in June 1983, the Soviets had sent up cosmonauts Valentina Tereshkova (1963) and Svetlana Savitskaya (1983).

(via coolchicksfromhistory)



8bitfuture:

3D printer adapted to print pharmaceuticals.
A team at the University of Glasgow are working on a printer able to create downloadable pharmaceuticals.

The idea is still in its fledgling stages, but a pharmaceutical 3D printer would be loaded with simple molecules that would allow it to easily handle carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, plus vegetable oils, paraffin, and other common pharmaceutical ingredients. Cronin told the Guardian that with a relatively small number of “inks,” “you can make any organic molecule.”
So what are the advantages of printable drugs? For one thing, it lets you create modular drugs tweaked to individuals. Where it might not be worthwhile to manufacture custom drugs on a wide scale, having pharmaceuticals that are printed off in smaller batches would give people access to drugs that are aligned with their unique biochemistry. And there’s the portability of manufacture; suddenly, you’d be able to manufacture any drug anywhere in the world.

8bitfuture:

3D printer adapted to print pharmaceuticals.

A team at the University of Glasgow are working on a printer able to create downloadable pharmaceuticals.

The idea is still in its fledgling stages, but a pharmaceutical 3D printer would be loaded with simple molecules that would allow it to easily handle carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, plus vegetable oils, paraffin, and other common pharmaceutical ingredients. Cronin told the Guardian that with a relatively small number of “inks,” “you can make any organic molecule.”

So what are the advantages of printable drugs? For one thing, it lets you create modular drugs tweaked to individuals. Where it might not be worthwhile to manufacture custom drugs on a wide scale, having pharmaceuticals that are printed off in smaller batches would give people access to drugs that are aligned with their unique biochemistry. And there’s the portability of manufacture; suddenly, you’d be able to manufacture any drug anywhere in the world.

(via 8bitfuture)


frontal-cortex:

Euprymna berryi / Berry’s bobtail squid This small squid uses two arms to sweep sand over its body after burying itself. Both squids and cuttlefish use small sacs of pigment in their skin to to change their colouring and markings. Due to its small size, these sacs are very obvious in the bobtail squid. (Caption : Science Photo Library)
Rokus Groeneveld & Sanne Reijs

frontal-cortex:

Euprymna berryi / Berry’s bobtail squid
This small squid uses two arms to sweep sand over its body after burying itself. Both squids and cuttlefish use small sacs of pigment in their skin to to change their colouring and markings. Due to its small size, these sacs are very obvious in the bobtail squid. (Caption : Science Photo Library)

Rokus Groeneveld & Sanne Reijs


polerin:

the-painted-wren:

wethetrees:

roseweightless-blue:

The Sun and Inner Planets Moving Through Space
People always seem to forget that our solar system isn’t stationary. We’re all flying through spaaace, man.

dude.

This never occurred to me.
Whoa.
I might just start screaming in horrified joy.



This is why time travel stories make me laugh. just… yeah. You wanna travel back 200 years? Cool…  have fun in hard vacuum.

polerin:

the-painted-wren:

wethetrees:

roseweightless-blue:

The Sun and Inner Planets Moving Through Space

People always seem to forget that our solar system isn’t stationary. We’re all flying through spaaace, man.

dude.

This never occurred to me.

Whoa.

I might just start screaming in horrified joy.

This is why time travel stories make me laugh. just… yeah. You wanna travel back 200 years? Cool… have fun in hard vacuum.


I know of no time in human history where ignorance was better than know­ledge.

amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff view the suspended blue whale model in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, February 1969
 Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp 
© AMNH Library/Image # 333998

amnhnyc:

From the archives: Museum staff view the suspended blue whale model in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, February 1969

 Explore all the photos from the Picturing the Museum collection here: http://bit.ly/l8nOsp 

© AMNH Library/Image # 333998


wnycradiolab:

staceythinx:

The Atlantic’s In Focus has assembled a phenomenal photo gallery of The Fantastic Machine That Found the Higgs Boson.

Now that’s a nice looking machine. 


kqedscience:

Oscar Pistorius Will Be the First Amputee to Compete in the Olympic Games“Last year he became the world’s first amputee to run in the World Championships, and today it was announced that Pistorius, whose legs were both amputated below the knee at less than a year old, will become the first amputee to run in the Olympic Games this summer in London.”

kqedscience:

Oscar Pistorius Will Be the First Amputee to Compete in the Olympic Games

“Last year he became the world’s first amputee to run in the World Championships, and today it was announced that Pistorius, whose legs were both amputated below the knee at less than a year old, will become the first amputee to run in the Olympic Games this summer in London.”




photojojo:

What you’re looking at is actual human blood vessels from a human’s face. They’re frozen in time by the magic of plastic.
The Human Body Preserved by Plastic
via kateoplis

photojojo:

What you’re looking at is actual human blood vessels from a human’s face. They’re frozen in time by the magic of plastic.

The Human Body Preserved by Plastic

via kateoplis


magicalnaturetour:

Little seahorse checks his reflection in the diver’s watch by Don McLeish via Imigur :)

magicalnaturetour:

Little seahorse checks his reflection in the diver’s watch by Don McLeish via Imigur :)

(via faysbook)